Dating brass dial clock

A form of provincial, weight-driven clock originally made in the vicinity of Morbier in the Franche*-Comt region of France (Conte in the old spelling), near the Swiss frontier, from the late 17th century to the beginning of the 20th.

Painted dial clocks appeared about 1765 to 1780, and after this the brass dial clock ceased to be made, again with just a few exceptions in rural areas, especially the far southern counties of England.

If your grandfather clock has a brass dial, it was probably made in the period between 16.

The early brass dial clocks only had one hand, because the average person had no need of knowing the time to the nearest minute, and with a bit of practise you can tell the time to the nearest five minutes on one of these early (and rare) clocks.

The majority of English grandfather clocks were made in The Midlands and the North of England.

The new painted dial was cheaper and easier to produce and easier to read by the poor light available at night, so the brass dial was dropped from production over a very brief period, for our purposes it is fair to say that no brass dial clock was made in the big clock making centres after 1780.

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